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Guest Jess

Neutered male bleeding

My male 4 year old chinchilla was castrated today. I moved him into a smaller cage and put in ledges to help him get around easier and more comfortably. Nice warm bedding (t shirts) so I could check for poop, wee and blood etc. No wheel. Very basic cage for him to recover in. Vets have given me pain meds to start tomorrow but I think he has chewed at his wound and it's bleeding. He freaks out when I put my hand even near the cage and I know this could cause more damage. He isn't eating or drinking right now but vets advised this may happen due to such a heavy day for him. I turned off the lights and he is now in his box calmed down. The emergency vets don't offer telephone advice only in clinic which could Costner me almost £200 and that's only consultation. Has anyone been in this situation before? The cage was disinfected only today so is clean and he is Ok in himself mostly.

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Hi, I've nudged a member that will be best able to advise you here. Hopefully she'll be along soon to advise you.

if it's a lot of blood I'd probably take him back to the vet ASAP  .  

They can often be quite groggy following surgery.  All I can suggest is maybe putting a few tempting things near him maybe a little mini shredded wheat or some dry oats .   Try softening some pellets in water and offering them by spoon ... some will eat this way others  need syringe fed. 

Wishing the little fella a speedy recovery.  You'll hopefully see a big improvement in the morning .

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I'm sorry I didn't see this last night.

 

How is chinny this morning?

 

i have done a post in the reference section in post- op care which I'm hoping you might have found? 

 

If not, this little chap needs taking back to the vet this morning - he needs to have some food and fluids. Did the vet give you any syringe/recovery food to give him?

If not, it is worth moistening pellets into a mush and feeding him via syringe or a spoon as Kimbers suggested. 

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Why are so many people opting to neuter their male chins just recently? I was always of the belief that to neuter a male was an extremely risky procedure, and only undertaken if life was in danger.

 

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33 minutes ago, Pepperpot said:

Why are so many people opting to neuter their male chins just recently? I was always of the belief that to neuter a male was an extremely risky procedure, and only undertaken if life was in danger.

 

That's true of females - spaying a female is a hugely invasive, risky procedure and should only be undertaken as a last resort by a competent vet (in my opinion). Having had several females spayed over the last few years and dealt with the post-op care, I certainly don't recommend it!

 

For males, the surgery is less risky (in some respects) but is still risky, partly due to the necessity of closing up the inguinal canal. Having said that, I've had many male chinnies neutered over the years without major issues. 

 

Good post-op care and excellent pain relief, plus getting the chin eating and drinking as soon as they wake up are the keys - some chins will chew their stitches so some vets use tissue adhesive (surgical superglue) to keep everything secured. My vets give syringe food as soon as the chin wakes after surgery and can swallow - that makes a huge difference to their recovery. 

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There's a new collar which has been invented specifically for chins to prevent chewing of wounds. It obviously doesn't allow coprophagy but it could save lives.
Wishing you lots of luck with your boy- I had one chew his wound once and it is so distressing. For that reason I've left my males intact but I do wish Mylo could cuddle up with a girlie.

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On 19/12/2016 at 10:56 AM, Pepperpot said:

Why are so many people opting to neuter their male chins just recently? I was always of the belief that to neuter a male was an extremely risky procedure, and only undertaken if life was in danger.

 

When I took my 2 male brother Chinchillas to my vet for their first general check up, she said they were really healthy and it was nice to see, but she then tried to convince us to have them neutered. She Came up with so many arguments like it will reduce aggression because apparently their hormones will get the better of them sooner or later and the potential of this and that complication. But if it's not broke, why fix it? why make my chinchillas which were still settling in and getting to accept us go through that experience? I did not see the need ATM and thought it was more like a money making scheme so I kindly refused.

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Absolutely, Pepperpot- I would only do it for medical reasons- it's better to keep an aggressive male alone than put his life in danger most of the time. If the chin was biting me, then that might be due cause, but even then, I'd wear gloves unless it was extreme- most anti-social behaviour can be rectified using environmental change or homeopathic remedies- Belinda got me onto agnus castus for hormone issues and I find it extremely effective, you just need to tweak the dose for each animal.

Edited by Meles Meles
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Why are so many people opting to neuter their male chins just recently? I was always of the belief that to neuter a male was an extremely risky procedure, and only undertaken if life was in danger.

Hi Mel,

i have a young Violet male chin who I've just split from his cage mate due to bullying issues. This little guy is a testosterone bomb at the moment, cock sure of himself, territorial and narky. I've been bitten by him a couple of times, needed to do the glove thing, but would still not entertain castration. With the correct firm but gentle handling, he's settling slowly and realising that biting is getting him nowhere. I shall be introducing Angus Castus to him shortly. I've had excellent results with this before.

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Herbal castration, lol! :D
Mylo bites my feet if there's a boy he doesn't like in his room, he doesn't mess about either- we are talking blood- very ANGRY biting. I had one male I had to keep in a different room, which is why I mention environmental change. I used agnus castus with him for years but I also find magnesium oxide useful and had him on that for a year or so- it's easier than doing the bottle thing every day and boiling off the alcohol. Debbie got me into that. Now he has a wife he's happy as Larry so we are all very dopey right now. ^_^

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